Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

This site uses cookies. By using our services, you agree to our cookie use.
Learn more here.

Building Brazil: from the Cariocas to the Paulistas to the now

Brazil keynote intermezzo children sesc pompeia lina bo bardi architectural review

Emerging from the desolation wrought by war, the Modernism of the Carioca and Paulista schools inspired successive generations of architects in Brazil with hope and ambition

The grill room of the Art Deco Cassino Atlântico was packed to the brim when the evening’s guest of honour arrived. Almost on the stroke of nine on 1 July 1942, Philip Goodwin, head of the department of architecture at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, stepped into the room, the windows of which faced out over Copacabana, and greeted Brazilian architects, artists and politicians. With the Pão de Açúcar (Sugarloaf Mountain) as backdrop, the North American bid his farewells after a two-month sojourn in Brazil. His trip, with photographer GE Kidder Smith, was to gather elements for Brazil Builds: Architecture New and Old 1652-1942, an exhibition being prepared at MoMA. 

Brazil keynote gustavo capanema palace health education architectural review

Brazil keynote gustavo capanema palace health education architectural review

Source: Kurt Hutton/Picture Post/Getty Images

A queue outside Rio’s Gustavo Capanema Palace (the Ministry of Education and Health building) in 1950

Brazil keynote builds catalogue mcknight kauffer architectural review

Brazil keynote builds catalogue mcknight kauffer architectural review

Before the exhibition opened in January of the following year, Life magazine published a piece with photos by Kidder Smith in anticipation of some of the images to be shown at MoMA. The feature held Brazilian works as the ‘most interesting in the world’ and praised the work of Oscar Niemeyer who, at the time, was only 34. His fame, and that of his generation, was catalysed by the exhibition. Consisting of photos, models, full-scale reproductions of brise-soleil and potted tropical plants, Brazil Builds toured 48 cities in the Americas – US cities, as well as Mexican, Canadian and Brazilian ones. It crossed the Atlantic in 1944 and made its way to London, where it prompted a special issue of The Architectural Review.

The exhibition did more than showcase the first generation of Modernist Brazilian designers; it also had a political side. Orchestrated by Nelson Rockefeller, the millionaire president of the museum who was a part of the Office of Inter-American Affairs and had economic interests in the country, Brazil Builds was conceived as a North American war effort to cosy up to the South American giant – whose president, Getúlio Vargas, was on the verge of an alignment with Italy and Germany. ‘The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the American Institute of Architects in the spring of 1942 were both anxious to have closer relations with Brazil, a country which was to be our future ally’, read the opening statement in Goodwin’s catalogue. The luxurious, 200-page hardback was even more effective than the exhibition: it presented modern Brazilian architecture as a beacon of hope for a world devastated by war. With its freshness and verve, the ‘Brazilian school’, led by Lúcio Costa, brought together European (ie Le Corbusier) ideas and Luso-Brazilian construction. Pilotis and free plans combined with blues, greens, wooden lattices and tile work. 

Brazil keynote architectural review 1944 kidder smith philip goodwin

Brazil keynote architectural review 1944 kidder smith philip goodwin

The centrepiece of it all was the headquarters of the Ministry of Education and Health, based on a design by Le Corbusier sweetened and softened by Niemeyer’s talent; Goodwin regarded it as the most significant Modernist building in the Western world. An expression of the new country’s modernity, the building’s original sin – as with much of Rio de Janeiro’s architecture – was being sponsored by the state, a modernising yet dictatorial government.

The exhibition and the catalogue were received very positively in Brazil and used as ballast with which to solidify modern architecture’s reputation with society and the government. And yet one criticism levelled by architects from São Paulo was the fact that Brazil Builds represented an official Carioca, or Rio-based, version of Modernist Brazilian architecture. In an article published in 1944, for example, Luís Saia criticised the absence of the young Vilanova Artigas’s work. In hindsight, the text foresaw the polarisation of the two Brazilian architectural schools: the school of Rio de Janeiro and the school of São Paulo.

Brazil keynote niemeyer artigas paulista carioca architectural review

Brazil keynote niemeyer artigas paulista carioca architectural review

Source: Cristiano Mascaro

Niemeyer, in the centre, looks as if he is bowing down. Following 15 years of Carioca dominance, the Paulista School takes over, led by Artigas, standing on the left

Initially dubbed the ‘Brazilian school’, the ‘Carioca school’ reached its pinnacle within 15 years, an achievement made very clear in Henrique Mindlin’s 1956 book Modern Architecture in Brazil, which had a preface by Sigfried Giedion. Two years later, the federal government, under Juscelino Kubitschek, decided to build a new capital from scratch, bringing about a plan that had been cropping up ever since the final days of the Brazilian Empire at the end of the 19th century. Lúcio Costa won the competition to design the city’s masterplan, while Niemeyer designed its most emblematic buildings. Both the beginning and the end of the Carioca school were state-sponsored, troubled affairs. In the case of Brasília there was even a ‘meeting between adults’, as Niemeyer called the orgy in which the jury members participated. 

The capital was inaugurated three years later. Niemeyer’s magnificent creative effort triggered an architectural stir and many of his colleagues surpassed themselves and their earlier creative limits. It was during the early days of Brasília that Sérgio Bernardes, for example, designed his most important projects: the Brazilian Pavilion for the Brussels 1958 World’s Fair and São Cristóvão Pavilion in Rio de Janeiro.

As an additional answer to Niemeyer’s stimulus, Vilanova Artigas consolidated what would later be known as the Paulista School, or Paulista Brutalism, with a small school, designed in 1959, near the coast of São Paulo state. Unlike Rio de Janeiro, where the projects established a clear relationship with nature – be it the natural scenery or Roberto Burle Marx’s landscape design – in São Paulo they became introverted: concrete boxes, turned inwards, with dramatic roof lighting. There was no lightness to these structure; they were calibrated by rational poetry. Both schools contained the same tectonic potency, the same common thread: ‘Brazilian architecture is a horizontal line raised from the ground’, in the words of the Portuguese architect Alexandre Alves Costa, ‘a simple and delicate affirmation of hope in the future, an irresistible force of dissolution of [Brazil’s] poor and oppressed past, the foundation of the motherland, abstract and metaphysical’. 

Brazil keynote architecture students vilanova artigas fauusp architectural reivew

Brazil keynote architecture students vilanova artigas fauusp architectural reivew

Source: Raul Garcez / Vilanova Artigas Family Collection

Architecture students, gathered in 1968, are encircled by dramatic walls of exposed reinforced concrete in Vilanova Artigas’s FAUUSP. The scheme epitomises spatial continuity, with six levels linked by ramps to convey the feeling of a single plane

Brazil keynote juscelino kubitschek time architectural review

Brazil keynote juscelino kubitschek time architectural review

Juscelino Kubitschek graces the 13 February 1956 cover of TIME magazine. The former Brazilian president initiated the construction of Brasília in the late 1950s, commissioning Oscar Niemeyer to design the new city’s public buildings

Like Niemeyer, Artigas was a communist – but he saw architecture as part of a political project and his work was both libertarian and radical. The contrast between public and private spaces in domestic environments was harsh: sleeping quarters were the size of Franciscan cells, and beds, tables and dressers were of concrete, while common areas were generously proportioned in an evocation of public squares. During his tenure as a professor at the Faculdade de Arquitetura e Urbanismo da Universidade de São Paulo (FAU-USP), Artigas gathered dozens of disciples, including Paulo Mendes da Rocha and Pedro Paulo de Melo Saraiva. 

The military coup of 1964 placed the Brazilian cultural vanguards under a stranglehold out of which neither the Paulista nor the Carioca schools managed to wriggle. Niemeyer clashed with the military in Brasília, and had his designs swiftly replaced. Faced with invitations to work abroad, he went to France, where a solidary decree signed by the then culture minister, André Malraux, allowed him to work and design as if he were a French citizen. He soon opened an office on the Champs-Élysées.

In São Paulo, Artigas suffered severe consequences due to his more radical views and a comparative lack of social prestige: five months after the coup, he was arrested for 12 days. Fearing further arrest, he departed on a self-imposed exile to Uruguay. His FAU-USP graduates, meanwhile, chose him as their valedictorian and his speech, written in Montevideo, was read by Paulo Mendes da Rocha, his assistant at the school: ‘You will not shy away, isolated, from the hard struggles our people are facing in building a free and independent homeland. You shall build the monuments that will celebrate their victory’.

Brazil keynote paulo mendes da rocha return fauusp architectural review

Brazil keynote paulo mendes da rocha return fauusp architectural review

Source: Paulo Mendes da Rocha Archive

Paulo Mendes da Rocha, disciple of Vilanova Artigas, addresses students at the University of São Paulo after returning following his expulsion by the government. The two architects exemplify the Paulista School, which spurned the curves that typify Niemeyer’s architecture

Brazil keynote paulo mendes da rocha sketch architectural review

Brazil keynote paulo mendes da rocha sketch architectural review

Source: Paulo Mendes da Rocha Archive

Sketch by Paulo Mendes da Rocha

Artigas returned to Brazil the following year, with a habeas corpus writ. His family had been forced to sell most of its assets to survive. Construction of his designs for FAU-USP’s new school of architecture began in 1966 and the building was inaugurated in 1969, the same year Artigas was removed from both the school and his daily contact with his students. On 25 April, Institutional Act (IA) No 5, which legally empowered the dictatorial regime to prevent its enemies from working in any public capacity, compulsorily retired him from the university. He was 53 years old. A few days later, Mendes da Rocha, at age 40, suffered the same fate. The government had the power to rescind any public contract on its behalf at any time, under any circumstances. The FAU-USP and the university were silent, either through fear or consent. With IA No 5, the dictatorship plunged into darkness. Artigas saw terror grip his former companions. Many were tortured. In return, he channelled his energy towards his office on the fifth floor of the Instituto dos Arquitetos do Brasil building in São Paulo. Between 1968 and 1974, the average annual growth of the Brazilian economy was 10 per cent, leading the military government to carry out extensive infrastructure works. As with many architecture offices and firms, Artigas took over dozens of public commissions.

The 1970s opened the horizons beyond concrete boxes. In spite of the heated debate over the closure of specialist magazines and academia’s silence, there was some creative life still. Concrete as a means of expression lost its importance as dozens of authors expressed themselves using alternative materials – from Francisco de Assis Couto dos Reis’s bricks, inspired by Louis Kahn, for the headquarters of the São Francisco Hydroelectric Company in Salvador to Severiano Porto and Mário Emílio Ribeiro’s work in the Amazon. Fledgling Postmodernists emerged in Minas Gerais; echoing international debate, these young architects challenged the use of concrete. But the highlight of Brazilian architectural counterculture was Casa Bola (Ball House), a housing prototype built in São Paulo by Eduardo Longo, the concrete walls of which appear to cannibalise themselves.

The oil crisis helped to curb the offshoots of the Paulista School. The best, most symbolic example of this was the ultimate shelving of a mammoth concrete design proposed for the SESC (Serviço Social do Comércio) Pompéia. The client decided, instead, to maintain the fabric of the old brick factory and hired Lina Bo Bardi to adapt it.

In 1991, with the country’s return to democracy and after years of no architecture competitions, two of Artigas and Mendes da Rocha’s young students – Angelo Bucci and Álvaro Puntoni – won the contest for Brazil’s pavilion at the Seville Expo 1992 with a design for a concrete box with a great span, three points of support and an introspective spatiality, taking up the precepts of the Paulista School. The design buried the infectious joy of Niemeyer’s sinuosity and Burle Marx’s exuberance for good: Brazil’s social abyss couldn’t be camouflaged by gentleness.

Brazil keynote seville expo angelo bucci alvaro puntoni architectural review

Brazil keynote seville expo angelo bucci alvaro puntoni architectural review

The winning competition entry for Brazil’s pavilion at the Seville Expo 1992 by Angelo Bucci and Álvaro Puntoni

Puntoni and Bucci were accused of being regressive: ‘A span of nothing’, read one headline about the competition. After all, young people were not supposed to be using the old language – an apparently cowardly and conservative option. Why not look for an alternative path towards a new reality? The ensuing debate was heated: few endorsed a return to the Paulista School, which was seen as a utopia cut short by military dictatorship. The reaction reflected the climate of renewal, a libertarian carnival stimulated by the freshly resurfaced architecture magazines. On the one hand, the rattle rang with the winds of architectural Postmodernism carried over from the Northern Hemisphere; on the other, the tambourine reverberated with the dissemination of several possible architectural directions in Brazil – regionalist tendencies that shed light on hitherto marginalised authors. Beyond the profession itself, the rhythm was set by snare drums and low toms beating to the redemocratisation process, expressed in the election of the President of the Republic by direct vote in 1989, after two and a half decades of tyranny.

The participants in the pavilion competition were part of the so-called Seville Generation, which fuelled a return to the fundamental tenets of the Paulista School – a spark that became an open flame with Mendes da Rocha’s return to FAU-USP. The Seville Generation was nurtured, first and foremost, by the freshness of the professor’s work – at the time, he was busy making a stone float in the sky to form the Museum of Sculpture – and progressed to become contributors to his late international rise to fame. This was reflected in a slew of important international awards including the Pritzker, RIBA’s Gold Medal and Venice’s Golden Lion. In spite of this, the creations of the Seville Generation ran the risk of degenerating into some sort of Neobrutalism, as its critics warned as early as 1991. It would have been easy to replicate their alma mater’s spatial and constructive elements while diluting their political content. Brazil and the world changed dramatically between the 1950s and the ’90s: gone was the belief in the innocence of the Kubitschek years that had brought about Niemeyer’s curves and the melodies of bossa nova, the left-right dualism of the ’60s that had fostered Artigas’s severe concrete. What was the apt architectural answer to the democracy years? 

Brazil keynote fiestp cultural mmbb paulo mendes da rocha architectural review

Brazil keynote fiestp cultural mmbb paulo mendes da rocha architectural review

Source: Nelson Kon

The Seville Generation – FIESP cultural centre, São Paulo, by MMBB and Paulo Mendes da Rocha (2009)

Brazil keynote weekend house angelo bucci spbr architectural review

Brazil keynote weekend house angelo bucci spbr architectural review

Source: Nelson Kon

The Seville Generation – weekend house, São Paulo, by Angelo Bucci of spbr arquitetos (2013)

Almost three decades after the Seville competition, Bucci and Puntoni are now mature professionals. Bucci’s wings are the largest of his generation, flying as he does across the continents, building bridges as he goes. Seductive and persistent, he took up the poetics of Mendes da Rocha and added a few new ingredients of his own. Puntoni now heads up the Grupo SP office with João Sodré and, in a way, was the binding element behind the Seville Generation, which includes MMBB, Andrade Morettin and UNA Arquitetos. 

São Paulo’s current architectural scene isn’t limited to the Seville Generation: one group revolves around Uruguayan Héctor Vigliecca, who brought a fresh perspective by stressing the need to reappraise traditional urban fabric; USINA Centro de Trabalhos para o Ambiente Habitado (Work Center of the Inhabited Environment) developed through a fostering of the idea of the habitational mutirão (joint effort), in which the residents build their houses in São Paulo’s suburbs; and Alexandre Delijaicov is the embodiment of the state architect working for the collective good, echoing Hélio Duarte and Affonso Eduardo Reidy. The team he leads has designed dozens of Centros Educacionals Unificados on the city’s edge.

Brazil keynote instituto tecnologico aeronotica campos metro arquitetos architectural review

Brazil keynote instituto tecnologico aeronotica campos metro arquitetos architectural review

Source: leonardo finotti

The Seville Generation – Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, São José dos Campos, by METRO Arquitetos (2017)

Brazil keynote sebrae brasilia grupo sp luciano margotto 1 architectural review

Brazil keynote sebrae brasilia grupo sp luciano margotto 1 architectural review

Source: Nelson Kon

The Seville Generation – Sebrae HQ, Brasília by Grupo SP + Luciano Margotto (2010)

Component industrialisation was also the watchword of João Filgueiras Lima’s professional life. After working on Brasília’s construction with Niemeyer, Lelé (as he was known) adopted reinforced mortar to create powerful buildings that house schools, hospitals and other public facilities. He was Niemeyer’s most accomplished disciple, yet Lelé’s work is much more pragmatic. Niemeyer’s achievements and his curves representing the stereotypical creative, careless, womanising Brazilian would be unthinkable today. What architecture could represent the country’s diversity, from the Yanomami leader Davi Kopenawa to top model Gisele Bündchen? 

The result of the Seville competition foreshadowed São Paulo’s dominance in Brazil. The polarisation between São Paulo and Rio was firmly in the past: Brasília had dried up the source of bureaucratic resources that had previously fed Rio’s production. Today, the second centre for architecture is Belo Horizonte, where two generations of architects coexist: the older one, with Gustavo Penna as its star, is the result of Postmodern effervescence while members of the younger generation, including BCMF and Vazio S/A, divide their time between drawing board and classroom. 

Perversely, the pavilion for the Seville Expo was never built. The state’s disregard for the Seville competition was a sign of the difficulties these young architects would come to face. The Seville Generation fought on for almost three decades without any support from the state or private initiative, preaching to the wind and scraping by via small commissions and teaching positions. The fate of MMBB’s Brazilian pavilion for the Expo 2020 Dubai lies in the hands of the Bolsonaro administration. The government chooses its projects through bid proposals – that is, for the lowest possible cost. Governing authorities do not value the role of architecture: the Minha Casa, Minha Vida (My House, My Life) federal programme, which gives real-estate loans to private investors so they can solve the housing problem, refuses to treat social housing as a dignified, high-quality government strategy. The catastrophic results can be seen in peripheries across the country, in groups of houses or banal four-storey blocks that have created ‘non-cities’.

Brazil keynote feminist margaridas march niemeyer congress brasilia architectural review

Brazil keynote feminist margaridas march niemeyer congress brasilia architectural review

Source: ap / shutterstock

The feminist Margaridas march in front of Oscar Niemeyer’s 1960 National Congress in Brasília on 14 August 2019. The concave dome of the building is the Senate, the convex dome is the House of Representatives

Brazil keynote economist architectural review blown i1

Brazil keynote economist architectural review blown i1

A 2013 issue of The Economist

Before the 2014 economic crisis, there was increasing demand from increasingly demanding clients, people who frequent sophisticated temples of consumption, hotels and restaurants. The realm of home improvement, which fills billboards and roads with specialised shops, is crystallised in 2,000m2 dream homes. The most sophisticated of these clients endorse contemporary architecture, designed by talented professionals such as Arthur Casas, Isay Weinfeld, Marcio Kogan, Paulo Jacobsen and Thiago Bernardes. The middle class chooses to protect itself behind the tall walls and private security services of a myriad characterless apartment blocks. Inside the walls, leisure areas and plenty of balconies create the illusion of a false life in the outdoors, complete with a barbecue pit for every apartment. 

There are more than 100,000 architects in Brazil but most are poorly trained; there is a lot of work, but it’s badly paid and not particularly demanding. The challenge of the new Brazilian generation is to find a place in which to express itself. The most significant commissions are those for cultural spaces, an area dominated by Niemeyer, until his death in 2012 at the age of 104. These commissions were then handed to international stars, such as Álvaro Siza or Christian de Portzamparc, who, in their own way, incorporated Brazilian elements into their works. Other foreigners weren’t as lucky: Herzog & de Meuron’s enormous 2009 cultural complex in São Paulo has been abandoned and Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s Museum of Image and Sound in Copacabana was supposed to open before the Rio Olympics – it stands unfinished today, a modern ruin. The new generation’s biggest opportunity came only recently, after it was invited to a competition for the Instituto Moreira Salles (IMS) on Paulista Avenue, which was won by Andrade Morettin. From Seville to the IMS, this generation’s trajectory makes plain the difficulties of being an architect in the country which gave us Niemeyer, yet casts shadows over its metropolises with Neoclassical towers.

Brazil keynote alexandre delijaicov andre takiya wanderley ariza ceu rosa da china architectural review

Brazil keynote alexandre delijaicov andre takiya wanderley ariza ceu rosa da china architectural review

Source: Nelson Kon

Alexandre Delijaicov, André Takiya and Wanderley Ariza’s CEU Rosa da China, São Paulo (2001)

Brazil keynote galeria claudia andujar inhotim arquitetos associados architectural review belo horizonte

Brazil keynote galeria claudia andujar inhotim arquitetos associados architectural review belo horizonte

Source: leonardo finotti

Galeria Claudia Andujar at Inhotim, outside Belo Horizonte by Arquitetos Associados (2015)

Brazil keynote pavilhao humanidade rio carla juacaba architectural review

Brazil keynote pavilhao humanidade rio carla juacaba architectural review

Source: Leonardo Finotti

Carla Juaçaba’s Pavilhão Humanidade in Rio de Janiero (2012)

A common narrative among foreign critics is that Brazilian walls hide away the best of Brazil’s national work: that contemporary Brazilian architecture specialises in building paradises and hellscapes. Designers often act between these two extremes, mirroring the country’s social inequalities; they urbanise favelas then design cinematographic projects for the wealthy. In response to security concerns, these two extremes build their walls ever higher. In between, there is nothing but an enormous ditch, the no man’s land of public space. Given the current political reality – hell bent on economic growth at the cost of social regression – Brazil seems to be moving further and further away from resolving its urban problems.

‘It’ll certainly be an enormous step back for Brazil if Bolsonaro wins’, Carla Juaçaba predicted in a 2018 interview for Portuguese newspaper Diário de Notícias. Juaçaba, a most distinguished member of the new generation of architects, creates delicate, ephemeral projects to international acclaim. Before she designed one of the chapels commissioned by the Vatican for Venice’s Architecture Biennale of 2018, she created Pavilhão Humanidade, one of the venues for Rio+20, which transformed the former capital into a stage for climate discussions in 2012. Built from scaffolding, the temporary pavilion stood over Fort Copacabana, right in front of where the old Cassino Atlântico – the backdrop to Goodwin’s farewell – used to be before it was demolished in the 1970s.

Brazil keynote praca das artes sao paulo brasil arquitetura architectural review

Brazil keynote praca das artes sao paulo brasil arquitetura architectural review

Source: Nelson Kon

Praça das Artes in São Paulo by Brasil Arquitetura (2012)

Brazil keynote museu arte rio bernardes jacobsen arquitetura architectural review

Brazil keynote museu arte rio bernardes jacobsen arquitetura architectural review

Source: leonardo finotti

Museu de Arte do Rio (MAR) by Bernardes Jacobsen Arquitetura (2013)

Brazil keynote atelier 77 casa firjan architectural review

Brazil keynote atelier 77 casa firjan architectural review

Source: MONIQUE CABRAL

Atelier 77’s Casa Firjan for the creative industries in Rio (2018)

After Juaçaba’s project was dismantled, much changed: Christ the Redeemer was pictured in a nosedive on the front cover of The Economist and Brazilian politics put the country between the devil and the deep blue sea, a situation out of which Bolsonaro was elected. The new government’s environmental concerns are as ephemeral as the scaffold pavilion. Instead of looking out to Copacabana while we bid Goodwin goodbye, we say goodbye to the ecological pavilion as if gazing at a lost utopia. Are we about to step into yet another long night in the South Atlantic?

Lead image: a sketch of the 1984 Intermezzo For Children exhibition at SESC Pompéia by Lina Bo Bardi. Emigrating in 1946, she found in Brazil ‘raw public material still immune to the effects of bad taste’ and, from that, created her own version of Modernism. By Lina Bo Bardi / © Marcia Benevento 

This piece was translated from the Portuguese by Anton Stark, and features in the AR October issue on Brazil – click here to purchase your copy today. The original text appears below

Building Brazil

O Grill Room do Cassino Atlântico estava repleto quando o homenageado da noite chegou. Perto das 21h do primeiro dia de julho de 1942, Philip Goodwin adentrou o ambiente com mais de 10 metros de altura e imensas janelas voltadas para Copacabana. O chefe do departamento de arquitetura do Museu de Arte Moderna de Nova York cumprimentou arquitetos, artistas e políticos brasileiros, entre mais de 100 convidados que compareceram ao banquete organizado pelo Instituto de Arquitetos do Brasil. Tendo o Pão de Açúcar como cenário de fundo, o norte-americano se despedia da temporada de dois meses no Brasil. A viagem, na companhia do fotógrafo G. E. Kidder Smith, teve como objetivo recolher elementos para Brazil Buids: architecture new and old 1652-1942, exposição que o MoMA estava preparando e que abriu em janeiro do ano seguinte.

Brazil keynote gustavo capanema palace health education architectural review

Brazil keynote gustavo capanema palace health education architectural review

Source: Kurt Hutton/Picture Post/Getty Images

A queue outside Rio’s Gustavo Capanema Palace (the Ministry of Education and Health building) in 1950

Brazil keynote builds catalogue mcknight kauffer architectural review

Brazil keynote builds catalogue mcknight kauffer architectural review

Antes mesmo da abertura da mostra, a revista Life publicou uma matéria com fotos de Kidder Smith, antecipando algumas imagens que seriam expostas. Quase uma peça de divulgação, a reportagem tratou a produção brasileira como ‘a mais interessante do mundo’ e fez elogios a Oscar Niemeyer, que na ocasião tinha 34 anos. A fama do jovem projetista e sua geração começou a nascer com mostra. Composta por fotos, maquetes, reproduções de quebra-sol em escala natural e vasos com plantas tropicais, Brazil Builds itinerou por 48 cidades na América, entre norte-americanas, mexicanas, canadenses e brasileiras. Cruzou o Atlântico Norte em 1944, e chegou a Londres, gerando um número de The Architectural Review.

Em paralelo ao registro do desabrochar da primeira geração de projetistas brasileiros modernos, o evento teve uma função político, articulada por David Rockfeller, milionário que presidia o museu e integrava o Office of Inter-American Affairs e tinha interesses econômicos no país: ao lado do Zé Carioca [Joe Carioca], de Walt Disney, e de um filme de Orson Welles sobre o carnaval nunca terminado, Brazil Builds foi concebido como esforço de guerra norte-americano para aproximar-se do gigante sul americano, cujo presidente Getúlio Vargas oscilava entre um alinhamento com a Itália e a Alemanha.

Brazil keynote architectural review 1944 kidder smith philip goodwin

Brazil keynote architectural review 1944 kidder smith philip goodwin

‘The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the American Institute of Architectsts in the spring of 1942 were both anxious to have closer relations with Brazil, a country which was to be our future ally’, foram as primeiras palavras escritas no catálogo por Goodwin. O luxuoso volume com 200 páginas e capa dura foi mais potente do que a mostra: ele apresentou ao mundo a arquitetura moderna brasileira como um sopro de esperança para o mundo arrasado pelo pós-guerra. Com frescor e originalidade, a ‘escola brasileira’, liderada por Lucio Costa, misturava a produção europeia (leia-se Le Corbusier), com elementos das construções luso-brasileiras. Ou seja, o pilotis e a planta-livre foram combinados com cores azuis e verdes, treliças de madeira e azulejos. O suprassumo era a sede do Ministério da Educação e Saúde, projeto que partiu de um traço de Le Corbusier e foi adocicado pelo talento de Niemeyer, considerado por Goodwin como o mais significativo edifício moderno do mundo ocidental. Como expressão da face moderna do novo país, para o bem ou para o mal, o pecado original do edifício – e em grande parte da arquitetura do Rio de Janeiro – foi ter sido amparada pelo Estado, por um governo modernizador mas ditatorial.

A mostra e o catálogo repercutiram positivamente no Brasil, sendo usados como lastro de qualidade para valorização da produção moderna frente a sociedade e o governo. Contudo, uma da crítica formulada por paulistas foi o fato de Brazil Builds representar uma versão oficial e carioca, articulada por Lucio Costa. Em artigo publicado em 1944, por exemplo, Luís Saia criticou a ausência da produção do jovem Vilanova Artigas. Em retrospecto, o texto antecipa a polarização das duas escolas arquitetônicas brasileiras: a do Rio de Janeiro e a de São Paulo.

Inicialmente chamada de ‘escola brasileira’, a ‘escola carioca chegou ao topo em menos de 15 anos, como ficou patente em 1956 no livro Modern Architecture in Brazil, escrito por Henrique Mindlin e com prefácio de G. Giedion. Dois anos depois, o governo federal, liderado por Juscelino Kubitschek, resolveu construir uma nova capital, plano corrente desde o final do império. O presidente era o mesmo político que, quinze anos antes, como prefeito, havia encomendado o complexo de Pampulha a Niemeyer. Ele convidou seu arquiteto preferido a projetar a nova capital, mas Niemeyer preferiu desenhar os prédios simbólicos e deixar o plano para ser escolhido através de concurso. O início e o final da escola carioca foram estatais, ambos os processos conturbados. No caso de Brasília, houve até ‘uma reunião de adultos’, como escreveu Niemeyer a respeito da orgia em que os jurados participaram, entre eles o inglês William Holford. O representante do Instituto de Arquitetos do Brasil deu um voto em separado, em protesto, pois denunciou que havia sido excluído da decisão final (e também da reunião com as 10 mulheres).

Brazil keynote juscelino kubitschek time architectural review

Brazil keynote juscelino kubitschek time architectural review

Juscelino Kubitschek graces the 13 February 1956 cover of TIME magazine

Lucio Costa foi sagrado vencedor e a polêmica foi abafada. Os prédios principais, para os quais havia a promessa de outro concurso, foram criados por Niemeyer e a capital foi inaugurada em três anos. O magnífico esforço criativo de Niemeyer gerou reações arquitetônicas levando parte de seus colegas a produziram, paralelamente, seus melhores projetos. Se estava claro que ninguém atingia algo parecido – projetar a imagem dos novos palácios –, muitos se esforçaram para atingir seu próprio limite criativo. Sergio Bernardes, por exemplo, produziu no preâmbulo de Brasília seus principais projetos: o Pavilhão do Brasil na Feira Mundial da Bélgica, e o Pavilhão São Cristóvão, no Rio de Janeiro.

Também como resposta ao estímulo de Niemeyer, Vilanova Artigas sedimentou o que veio a ser batizado de ‘escola paulista’ ou ‘brutalismo paulista’: em 1959, ele desenhou uma pequena escola pública no litoral paulista que estabeleceu as bases da segunda escola arquitetônica do modernismo brasileiro. Ao contrário do Rio de Janeiro, onde as obras tinham franca relação com a natureza, fosse a paisagem natural ou o paisagismo de Burle Marx, em São Paulo elas eram ensimesmadas: voltadas para dentro, caixas de concreto com iluminações zenitais dramáticas. A estrutura não transparecia leveza, seguia esquemas calibrados com poesia racional. Ambas continham a mesma potencia tectônica, o fio condutor entre as duas: “arquitetura brasileira é uma linha horizontal levantada do chão, afirmação simples e delicada de esperança no futuro, força irresistível de dissolução do passado pobre e oprimido, fundação da pátria, abstrata e metafísica”, na definição do português Alexandre Alves Costa.

Brazil keynote architecture students vilanova artigas fauusp architectural reivew

Brazil keynote architecture students vilanova artigas fauusp architectural reivew

Source: Raul Garcez / Vilanova Artigas Family Collection

Architecture students, gathered in 1968, are encircled by dramatic walls of exposed reinforced concrete in Vilanova Artigas’s FAUUSP. The scheme epitomises spatial continuity, with six levels linked by ramps to convey the feeling of a single plane

Como Niemeyer, Artigas também era comunista. Contudo, para ele arquitetura era parte de um projeto político e sua obra libertária era radical: a relação entre os espaços públicos e privados eram brutos nos ambientes domésticos, por exemplo: os dormitórios tinham o tamanho de celas franciscanas, com camas, armários e mesas de concreto, enquanto a área comum eram generosas, em alusão as praças públicas. Como professor da Faculdade de Arquitetura da Universidade de São Paulo (FAUUSP), Artigas amealhou dezenas de discípulos, a exemplo de Paulo Mendes da Rocha e Pedro Paulo de Melo Saraiva.

O Golpe Militar de 1964, contudo, colocou asfixiou a vanguarda cultural brasileira e a arquitetura carioca e paulista não escaparam. Niemeyer entrou em conflitos com militares em Brasília, que substituíram seus projetos. Frente aos convites para trabalhar no exterior, contou com a solidariedade de um decreto assinado pelo Ministro da Cultura da França, André Malraux, permitindo que projetasse como se fosse francês. Abriu escritório na avenue Champs-Elysees.

Em São Paulo, com o discurso mais radical e sem o prestígio social de Niemeyer, Artigas sofreu duras consequências. Em 1961, ele havia projetado a nova sede da escola de arquitetura da FAUUSP – um edifício sem portas – enquanto lecionava na antiga escola, um palacete art nouveau. Como líder do Partido Comunista Brasileiro para assuntos arquitetônicos, sua casa passou a ser vigiada por agentes da repressão, 24 horas por dia. Cinco meses depois do golpe, a polícia invadiu a escola de arquitetura para prendê-lo. Ficou 12 dias isolado e ao ser solto declarou que o que menos importava era a sua integridade física – o problema era o terrorismo cultural.

Temendo nova detenção, exilou-se no Uruguai. Os formandos o escolheram como paraninfo e o discurso escrito em Montevideo foi lido por Paulo Mendes da Rocha, seu assistente na escola: ‘Não haveis de desfalecer, isolados, das duras lutas que trava o nosso povo para construir uma pátria livre e independente. Construireis os monumentos que comemorarão a sua vitória’.

Brazil keynote paulo mendes da rocha sketch architectural review

Brazil keynote paulo mendes da rocha sketch architectural review

Source: Paulo Mendes da Rocha Archive

Sketch by Paulo Mendes da Rocha

Artigas retornou ao Brasil no ano seguinte, com um habeas corpus. Para sobreviver, sua família vendeu bens. A construção da nova sede da escola de arquitetura começou em 1966. No início do ano seguinte, Artigas proferiu a aula inaugural para os calouros. Batizado de ‘O desenho’, o discurso tornou-se seu artigo mais conhecido. Em linhas gerais, ele respondeu à visão crescente de que o projeto de arquitetura seria um ofício politicamente alienado diante da realidade brasileira, controvérsia fortalecida pelo trio Sérgio Ferro, Flávio Império e Rodrigo Lefèvre. Formados em 1961, eles eram jovens professores e formularam um discurso baseado na poética da economia de meios, destacando experiência de pré-fabricação. Para eles, a atenção do arquiteto não poderia ater-se ao desenho ignorando sua relação com o canteiro de obra.

No primeiro semestre de 1969, em menos de dois meses, as emoções de Artigas experimentaram picos extremos: no alto, sua obra-prima foi inaugurada; nas profundezas, ele foi afastado da escola e do convívio dos alunos. No dia 25 de abril, o Ato Institucional no 5, que deu poderes jurídicos à ditadura cassar inimigos, aposentou-o compulsoriamente da universidade. Ele tinha 53 anos. Passados alguns dias, Mendes da Rocha, aos 40 anos, sofreu a mesma violência. Outro decreto presidencial agravou a situação do assistente: o governo tinha o poder de rescindir qualquer contrato público em seu nome. O medo ou o consentimento silenciou a escola de arquitetura e a universidade.

Enquanto os dois eram perseguidos, ironicamente o desenho da FAU recebeu o Prêmio Internacional Presidente da República, a láurea máxima na 10a Bienal de São Paulo, e Mendes da Rocha venceu o concurso pelo Pavilhão do Brasil, que representou oficialmente o país na Expo Osaka 1970, no Japão.

Com o Ato Institucional no5, a ditadura mergulhou em profunda escuridão, em uma noite profunda. Afastado do PCB, Artigas viu o terror atingir antigos companheiros. Presos por um ano, Rodrigo Lefèvre e Sérgio Ferro foram torturados. No período em que Artigas ficou longe da USP, a faculdade escanteou o projeto. Formaram-se bailarinos, cenógrafos, cineastas, escritores, enfim, tudo, mas poucos arquitetos. Em contrapartida, Artigas canalizou sua energia para o escritório no 5o andar do edifício do IAB, em São Paulo. Entre 1968 e 1974, o crescimento médio da economia brasileira foi de 10% ao ano. O viés desenvolvimentista levou o governo militar a executar obras de infraestrutura e, como muitos escritórios de arquitetura, o de Artigas assumiu dezenas de encomendas públicas.

Brazil keynote paulo mendes da rocha return fauusp architectural review

Brazil keynote paulo mendes da rocha return fauusp architectural review

Source: Paulo Mendes da Rocha Archive

Paulo Mendes da Rocha, disciple of Vilanova Artigas, addresses students at the University of São Paulo after returning following his expulsion by the government. The two architects exemplify the Paulista School, which spurned the curves that typify Niemeyer’s architecture

Como modelo arquitetônico dominante, a escola paulista ganhou campo de atuação mas diluiu seu viés ideológico entre centenas de obras de infraestrutura – rodoviárias, aeroportos, central de abastecimentos, escolas ou centros administrativos.

Em contrapartida a difusão da escola paulista, a década de 1970 abriu perspectivas para além das caixas de concreto. Mesmo com o debate amortecido com o fechamento das revistas de arquitetura e o silêncio universitário, o pulso criativo dava sinais vitais. Excluindo o concreto como expressão, dezenas autores se expressaram de maneira alternativa, desde os tijolos de Francisco de Assis Couto dos Reis, influenciado por Louis Kahn, para a sede da Companhia Hidrelétrica do São Francisco, em Salvador, ao trabalho de Severiano Porto e Mário Emílio Ribeiro na Amazônia. Minas Gerais viu aflorar imberbes pós-modernos. Reverberando as discussões internacionais, os jovens mineiros contestaram o discurso corrente do concreto. Todavia, o ponto alto da contracultura arquitetônica brasileira foi a Casa Bola, protótipo habitacional construído em São Paulo por Eduardo Longo. Trata-se de uma experiência sensorial, de contestação existencial estimulada por drogas, que compõe um processo autofágico ao deglutir as próprias paredes de concreto para alimentar a morada em forma uterina.

A crise do petróleo colaborou para frear os filhotes bastardos da escola paulista. Neste sentido, é simbólico o engavetamento de um projeto mamute de concreto proposto para o Sesc Pompeia. sensibilizada por experiências internacionais de revitalizações de antigos edifícios, o cliente resolveu manter a antiga fábrica de tijolos e contratou Lina Bo Bardi para adaptá-la.

Com os alunos embebecidos pelo contexto pós-moderno, Artigas voltou lecionar na FAUUSP em 1979, discursando que iria abandonar a condição de líder e esse papel passaria a Mendes da Rocha, que também retornou. Aos 64 anos, o velho líder da escola paulista retornou como auxiliar de ensino. Faltava um ano para ele se aposentar e a escola exigiu que ele prestasse exame para professor titular, o que lhe garantiria mais de recurso na velhice: sua pensão, que equivalia a 64 dólares, chegaria ao equivalente a 815 dólares. Contrariado, apresentou uma aula sobre a função social do arquiteto. No mês seguinte, começou a passar mal e foi diagnosticado um câncer linfático, morrendo em janeiro de 1985. O corpo foi velado longe da escola, como exigiu a viúva, abalada com a humilhação do concurso.

Brazil keynote seville expo angelo bucci alvaro puntoni architectural review

Brazil keynote seville expo angelo bucci alvaro puntoni architectural review

The winning competition entry for Brazil’s pavilion at the Seville Expo 1992 by Angelo Bucci and Álvaro Puntoni

Mas parte dos alunos absorveu os ensinamentos dele e de Mendes da Rocha. Em 1991, após a redemocratização do país e décadas sem concursos de arquitetura, dois destes jovens venceram 164 equipes que se enfrentaram pelo direito de desenhar o espaço do país na Expo de Sevilha, montada no ano seguinte. Em linhas gerais, o projeto vencedor era uma caixa de concreto, com grande vão, três pontos de apoios e espacialidade introspectiva, que retomava os preceitos da escola paulista. Mesmo que o exterior ainda julgasse pertinente ao verbete ‘Brazil’, a alegria contagiante da sinuosidade de Oscar Niemeyer e da exuberância de Burle Marx foi reservada pela equipe vencedora ao arquivo-morto: o abismo social brasileiro não poderia ser mascarado pela delicadeza.

O debate sobre o resultado foi atípico e acalorado: poucos validavam o retorno à escola paulista, vista como uma utopia amputada pela ditadura militar. A reação refletiu o clima de renovação, um carnaval libertário, estimulado pelas revistas de arquitetura, que ressurgiram. De um lado, o chocalho reverberava os ventos do pós-modernismo arquitetônico trazidos do hemisfério norte; do outro, o tamborim ecoava a difusão de diversas tendências arquitetônicas possíveis no Brasil, de sotaque regionalista, colocando luz sobre autores marginalizados. Para dar ritmo a batucada, além dos limites da profissão, as caixas e os surdos trepidavam a redemocratização do país expressa com a eleição do Presidente da República pelo voto direto em 1989 após duas décadas e meia de tirania.

Os vencedores, Angelo Bucci e Álvaro Puntoni, foram acusados de retrógrados: ‘Deu em vão’, perpetuou o título de um artigo sobre o concurso. Afinal de contas, não esperava-se dos jovens a antiga linguagem – uma opção aparentemente covarde e conservadora. Por que não procurar um caminho alternativo para nova realidade? Nacionalistas, os vencedores acreditavam no projeto país decepado pela ditadura. Assim como outros participantes do concurso, eles integram a chamada Geração Sevilha.

Brazil keynote fiestp cultural mmbb paulo mendes da rocha architectural review

Brazil keynote fiestp cultural mmbb paulo mendes da rocha architectural review

Source: Nelson Kon

The Seville Generation – FIESP cultural centre, São Paulo, by MMBB and Paulo Mendes da Rocha (2009)

Foi dela o oxigênio que alimentou a faísca do regresso aos preceitos fundamentais da escola paulista, chama acesa com o retorno dos velhos mestres ao corpo docente da FAUUSP. Como previu Artigas, Mendes da Rocha passou a liderar o processo. Mas a paixão pueril da Geração Sevilha não se fascinou só pelo discurso de Mendes da Rocha ou pela nostalgia de conhecer jovens ruínas de concreto: ela foi alimentada, sobretudo, pela frescor da produção do professor, que na época estava esculpindo o terreno sobre o qual fez flutuar a pedra no céu do Museu da Escultura. Os aprendizes participaram de sua ascensão internacional tardia, refletida em importantes prêmios internacionais – o Pritzker, a Medalha de Ouro do Riba, o Leão de Ouro em Veneza.

Os artefatos da Geração Sevilha, contudo, como já apontavam os críticos em 1991, corria o risco de desembocar em uma espécie de neobrutalismo: seria fácil replicar os elementos espaciais e construtivos da escola-mãe diluindo seu conteúdo político. Ora, da década de 1950 à 1990, o Brasil e o mundo mudaram. Ninguém mais acreditava na inocência dos anos Kubitschek, que gerou as curvas de Niemeyer e a melodia da bossa nova; e o dualismo esquerda-direita dos anos de 1960 que alimentou o concreto bruto de Artigas parecia ser coisa do passado. Qual seria a resposta arquitetônica para os anos de democracia? Aonde aqueles jovens irão chegar tendo aquele ponto de partida?

Passadas quase três décadas do concurso de Sevilha, Bucci e Puntoni estão maduros, caminhando para aos 60 anos. Consolidaram suas trajetórias trabalhando separados. Bucci é dono das assas mais longas de sua geração, voa pelos continentes tecendo pontes. Suas obras são engenhosas. Sedutor e persistente, ele retomou, com novos ingredientes, a poética de Mendes da Rocha. Tem habilidade para equilibrar estruturas como se fossem marionetes, atirantando a carga em cabos metálicos – lembrando os museus de Affonso Eduardo Reidy e Lina Bo Bardi.

Brazil keynote weekend house angelo bucci spbr architectural review

Brazil keynote weekend house angelo bucci spbr architectural review

Source: Nelson Kon

Weekend house, São Paulo, by Angelo Bucci of spbr arquitetos (2013)

Agitado e falante, Puntoni lidera o escritório Grupo SP na companhia de João Sodré. De certa maneira, ele foi o aglutinador da Geração Sevilha, composta por outros envolvidos no concurso: o MMBB, segundo colocado, e equipes formadas posteriormente por ex-estagiários, como Andrade Morettin e Una. Se os mais velhos – Puntoni, Bucci e MMBB – são mais próximos ao ideário da escola paulista, os mais novos estão mais distantes. Nesta faixa, o destaque é o Andrade Moretttin, que se alimenta do debate internacional, criando volumes opacos construídos com elementos pré-fabricados.

Para Andrade Morettin, o concreto não é um fetiche: atotam estruturas metálicas e de madeira, a maioria delas calculadas e executadas pelo engenheiro Hélio Olga, que começou construindo casas de Zanine Caldas, ex-maquetista de Niemeyer. O pulo do gato de Olga, sobre um abismo com 100% de inclinação, foi auxiliado com o traço de Marcos Acayaba, ex-aluno de Artigas ainda do tempo do casarão art nouveau.

A atual cena arquitetônica brasileira não se resume a Geração Sevilha. Outro polo gira em torno do uruguaio Héctor Vigliecca, que arejou o ambiente ao enfatizar a revalorização do tecido urbano tradicional. Dividindo-se entre projetos urbanos e arenas esportivas, seus olhos brilham ao tratar de habitação social. O debate da habitação social mudou no Brasil após os estudos coordenados por Carlos Nelson Ferreira dos Santos. Ao observar o valor do ambiente construído sem projeto, ele quebrou o paradigma moderno de destruir as ocupações irregulares das áreas centrais e erguer bairros nas periferias.

Brazil keynote instituto tecnologico aeronotica campos metro arquitetos architectural review

Brazil keynote instituto tecnologico aeronotica campos metro arquitetos architectural review

Source: leonardo finotti

Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, São José dos Campos, by METRO Arquitetos (2017)

Ecoando as lições de Sergio Ferro, o grupo Usina desenvolveu-se fomentando a lógica do mutirão habitacional, onde os próprios moradores constroem suas casas na periferia paulistana. Por outro lado, ecoando ensinamentos de Hélio Duarte e Reidy, Alexandre Delijaicov personifica a figura de arquiteto do Estado, que trabalha para o bem coletivo, liderando uma equipe que desenhou dezenas de CEUs na periferia de São Paulo, escolas com estrutura pré-moldada de concreto.

Em contraponto, a industrialização de componentes também foi o mote da vida profissional de João Filgueiras Lima. Após trabalhar na construção de Brasília com Niemeyer, Lelé – como era conhecido – adotou a argamassa armada para criar edifícios potentes, que abrigam escolas, hospitais e outros equipamentos públicos. Ele foi o mais potente discípulo de Niemeyer.

Contudo, seu tema, ao contrário do de seu mestre, enfrenta a realidade. É impensável materializar o feito de Niemeyer: sua curvas representaram o estereótipo do brasileiro, ou latinoamericano – criativo, desleixado e mulherengo. Que arquitetura espelharia a diversidade do país, do cacique Yanomami Davi Kopenawa à top model Gisele Bundchen? A rigidez das obras da geração Sevilha é digerida com dificuldade em grande parte do território, que divide-se entre o funk e o sertanejo universitário.

O resultado no concurso de Sevilha antecipou o domínio de São Paulo no contexto nacional. A polarização entre São Paulo e Rio é passado: a criação de Brasília secou a fonte de recursos burocráticos que alimentava a produção carioca. Hoje, o segundo polo arquitetônico brasileiro é Belo Horizonte onde convivem duas gerações: os mais velhos, cuja estrela é Gustavo Penna, fruto da ebulição pós-moderna, e os mais jovens, como BCMF, Vazio e Arquitetos Associados, que equilibram-se entre a prancheta e a sala de aula. Parte da produção destes jovens está em Inhotim, um museu privado de arte contemporânea.

Brazil keynote sebrae brasilia grupo sp luciano margotto 1 architectural review

Brazil keynote sebrae brasilia grupo sp luciano margotto 1 architectural review

Source: Nelson Kon

Sebrae HQ, Brasília by Grupo SP + Luciano Margotto (2010)

A hegemonia paulista também carrega o estigma do insucesso: o pavilhão de Sevilha não foi construído em razão da crise econômica e política. Se o seu fantasma de concreto simbolizou o início da geração, é cruel a comparação com as gerações anteriores e seus pavilhões: Niemeyer e Lucio Costa anteciparam em Nova York, em 1939, o que fizeram nos 20 anos seguintes, sendo adotados como projetistas oficiais; já Mendes da Rocha, em Osaka, de 1970, criou um dos seus projetos mais significativos e foi ignorado pela crítica internacional, que rendeu-se os seus encantos trinta e cinco anos depois. O desprezo oficial em Sevilha foi um sinal das dificuldades que os jovens enfrentariam. Na mão do governo Bolsonaro está o pavilhão brasileiro em Dubai, cujo concurso foi vencido por equipe liderada pelo MMBB, uma estrutura leve, com fechamento translúcido que ganha potência com projeções e música.

Sem o apoio do Estado ou da iniciativa privada, a Geração Sevilha resistiu por três décadas, discursando ao vento na mídia especializada e sobrevivendo de pequenos encargos e da docência. A consequência são as cidades brasileiras: se no extramuros não existem espaços públicos dignos, no intramuros não há quase nada de qualidade.

O medo da perseguição política do governo militar desarticulou as associações de classes, sobretudo o Instituto de Arquitetos do Brasil, que organiza concursos, mas, não regulamenta a profissão. Isso refletiu na baixa qualidade das bienais de arquitetura – montadas pelo IAB – e, principalmente, no descrédito dos concursos. Não há dúvida no julgamento; o calcanhar de Aquiles é o mesmo de Sevilha: 70% das propostas são engavetadas. O sistema persiste pois os certames são a maior fonte de renda do IAB.

O governo escolhe projetos por licitações, ou seja, por honorários mais baixos e os governantes não compreendem o papel da arquitetura: nos 30 anos de democracia, a arquitetura não foi adotada para melhor a vida nas periferias ou transporte público. Tratar habitação social como estratégia de governo com qualidade e dignidade vai de encontro ao programa federal ‘Minha casa, minha vida’ que aposta na concessão de crédito imobiliário para a iniciativa privada resolver o problema. O resultado catastrófico, explícito nas periferias de todo o país, são conjuntos de casas ou anódinos prédios de quatro andares, que criam não-cidades.

Brazil keynote feminist margaridas march niemeyer congress brasilia architectural review

Brazil keynote feminist margaridas march niemeyer congress brasilia architectural review

Source: ap / shutterstock

The feminist Margaridas march in front of Oscar Niemeyer’s 1960 National Congress in Brasília on 14 August 2019. The concave dome of the building is the Senate, the convex dome is the House of Representatives

Brazil keynote economist architectural review blown i1

Brazil keynote economist architectural review blown i1

A 2013 issue of The Economist

No âmbito privado, o enriquecimento fez nascer uma demanda de clientes exigentes, que frequentam sofisticados templos de consumo, hotéis e restaurantes. Pela própria característica sociocultural do país – que inclui sintomas como a desvalorização generalizada do espaço público, o desejo de conviver em estratos sociais ou ainda o reflexo da violência urbana -, a elite foi moldada valorizando espaços fechados. O reino da decoração, aflorado em enormes mostras e vias com lojas especializadas, se materializa em casas de sonho com mais de 2 mil metros quadrados. Por status ou formação, os mais sofisticados patrocinam a arquitetura contemporânea, assinada por talentosos profissionais, como Arthur Casas, Isay Weinfeld, Marcio Kogan, Paulo Jacobsen e Thiago Bernardes.

Os abastados são modelo para a classe média que também se protege com muros altos e segurança privada em imensos condomínios de torres residenciais sem caráter. Nos intramuros, há espaços de lazer e imensas varandas criam a ilusão de uma falsa vida ao ar livre com direto a churrasqueiras em cada apartamento. Na contramão, o pequeno incorporador Otávio Zarvos contratou a Geração Sevilha e os arquitetos do luxo para construiu edifícios na zona oeste de São Paulo.

Existem mais de 100 mil arquitetos no Brasil, mas a maioria é mal formada; existe muito trabalho, mas, pouco exigente e mal pago. O desafio é encontrar campo para se expressar. Os trabalhos mais nobre são os espaços culturais, terreno até recentemente dominado por Niemeyer. Depois, passou as estrelas internacionais, como Alvaro Siza e Cristian de Portzampac, cada qual a sua maneira incorporou nas obras elementos brasileiros que os sensibilizam. Com a mesma estratégia, outros estrangeiros não tiveram a mesma sorte. O enorme complexo cultural de Herzog & de Meurou em São Paulo foi abandonado. Em palestra na FAUUSP, Jacques Herzog foi hostilizado por alunos, que cobraram dele uma postura frente a gentrificação que o complexo traria (por outras razões, em seu lugar, foi construído 1,200 apartamentos sociais). Já o Museu da Imagem e do Som, em Copacabana, de Diller Scofidio + Renfro, estava prometido para abrir antes das Olimpíadas do Rio, mas a obra está parada em razão do afastamento da empresa construtora.

Brazil keynote alexandre delijaicov andre takiya wanderley ariza ceu rosa da china architectural review

Brazil keynote alexandre delijaicov andre takiya wanderley ariza ceu rosa da china architectural review

Source: Nelson Kon

Alexandre Delijaicov, André Takiya and Wanderley Ariza’s CEU Rosa da China, São Paulo (2001)

Brazil keynote galeria claudia andujar inhotim arquitetos associados architectural review belo horizonte

Brazil keynote galeria claudia andujar inhotim arquitetos associados architectural review belo horizonte

Source: leonardo finotti

Galeria Claudia Andujar at Inhotim, outside Belo Horizonte by Arquitetos Associados (2015)

Recentemente, a geração emergente teve sua maior oportunidade aos ser convocada para um concurso fechado do Instituto Moreira Salles (IMS), na avenida Paulista, a via mais nobre da cidade. Os seis concorrentes representam o atual dualismo brasileiro: de um lado, a geração Sevilha, acostumada a fazer escolas baratas na periferia mas treinados também pela demanda endinheirada; do outro, os melhores arquitetos da elite, mas que também participam dos concursos de habitação social. Andrade Morettin venceu a disputa. De Sevilha ao IMS, a trajetória desta geração demonstra as dificuldades de ser arquiteto no país de rendeu Niemeyer mas cria sombras nas metrópoles com torres neoclássicas.

Os muros brasileiros que escondem o melhor da produção nacional alimentam a anedota entre críticos estrangeiros, que dizem que a arquitetura contemporânea brasileira é especializada em paraísos e infernos. Espelhando as desigualdades sociais, os projetistas atuam, em alto nível, em extremos, da urbanização de favelas a projetos cinematográficos para os bem-nascidos. Respondendo a insegurança, estas duas pontas se encastelam, deixando uma enorme vala entre elas: o espaço público, terra de ninguém. Para o bem da cidadania, os arquitetos precisam ajudar os setores público e privado a encontrarem meios para produzir o espaço público no país. Com a realidade política vigente, que aposta no crescimento econômico a custa de retrocessos sociais, ameaçando o ativismo, o Brasil parece se afastar deste ideal.

Brazil keynote pavilhao humanidade rio carla juacaba architectural review

Brazil keynote pavilhao humanidade rio carla juacaba architectural review

Source: Leonardo Finotti

Carla Juaçaba’s Pavilhão Humanidade in Rio de Janiero (2012)

Brazil keynote praca das artes sao paulo brasil arquitetura architectural review

Brazil keynote praca das artes sao paulo brasil arquitetura architectural review

Source: Nelson Kon

Praça das Artes in São Paulo by Brasil Arquitetura (2012)

‘Certamente vai ser um retrocesso enorme para o Brasil, se o Bolsonaro ganhar’, previu Carla Juaçaba a um jornal português. Um dos destaques da nova geração, ela consegue materializar projetos delicados e efêmeros, chamando a atenção da crítica internacional. Ela integra a lista das notáveis mulheres arquitetas brasileiros, que representam 61% entre os profissionais mas são eclipsadas pelos colegas.

Antes de projetar uma das capelas encomendadas pelo Vaticano para a Bienal de Arquitetura de Veneza em 2018, Juaçaba criou um projeto sobre o Forte de Copacabana. Batizado de Pavilhão Humanidades, a construção era um dos polos do Rio+20, que transformou a antiga capital brasileira em palco das discussões climáticas em 2012. Construído com estrutura de andaimes, o pavilhão temporário ficava sobre o Forte de Copacabana, na frente de onde estava construído o antigo Cassino Atlântico, demolido na década de 1970 e palco da despedida de Goodwin.

Brazil keynote museu arte rio bernardes jacobsen arquitetura architectural review

Brazil keynote museu arte rio bernardes jacobsen arquitetura architectural review

Source: leonardo finotti

Museu de Arte do Rio (MAR) by Bernardes Jacobsen Arquitetura (2013)

Brazil keynote atelier 77 casa firjan architectural review

Brazil keynote atelier 77 casa firjan architectural review

Source: MONIQUE CABRAL

Atelier 77’s Casa Firjan for the creative industries in Rio (2018)

Após o projeto de Juaçaba, muita coisa mudou: o Cristo Redentor submergiu na capa da The Economist e a política brasileira levou o país para uma encruzilhada que elegeu Bolsonaro. A preocupação ambiental do novo governo se mostra tão efêmera quanto foi o pavilhão de andaimes. Ao invés de estarmos mirando Copacabana e nos despedindo de Goodwin, em função de sua ação positiva, dizemos adeus ao pavilhão ecológico como quem olha para uma utopia perdida. Adentramos a porta de mais uma noite longa no Atlântico Sul?