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Competition: Utica Junction Pavilion in Roseville, Detroit

The Roseville Downtown Development Authority has announced an open contest for a community-focused pavilion on a prominent downtown site (Deadline: 28 March)

The competition invites student and professional architects to draw up proposals for a new pavilion and community gathering space on a disused, city-owned plot on Utica Road near the junction with Gratiot Avenue.

The project aims to boost recreational, retail and artistic development in the area, known as Utica Junction, which is at the geographic heart of Roseville city and around 20km north-east of Detroit. Proposals must integrate a three-sided information kiosk, be fully accessible and reflect cultural aspects of the surrounding community.

Utica Junction, Roseville

Utica Junction, Roseville

Contest site

According to the brief: ‘The jury’s main aims are to develop a design that facilitates an open social environment for community members and visitors alike, with a pavilion structure being the main focal point.

‘The developer’s vision is to revitalise and sustain long-term economic stability for downtown businesses and provide an attractive place to shop, live and work while enhancing the arts and historic identity of Roseville.’

Roseville is a small city in the Macomb County of Michigan with around 48,000 residents. It is named after Roseville Post Office which was the first post office established in the area by William Rose in 1840. The village of Roseville was first incorporated in 1926.

Utica Junction, Roseville

Utica Junction, Roseville

Contest site

In December 2015, the City of Roseville formed a new downtown development authority to assist local businesses and promote regeneration in the core historic Utica Junction area.

The city’s two central roads – Utica Road and Gratiot Avenue – are both planned for upgrades as part of plans to stimulate local business and promote urban renaissance through community engagement.

The development authority has already drawn up simple plans for the project’s three-sided information kiosk, which should be positioned on the Utica road side of the site. A design sketch is available on the competition site.

The jury is seeking creative, coherent, feasible and high-quality design proposals capable of delivering a new focal point for the local community and providing for a diverse range of activities and users.

The winners will be chosen by the jury of six members featuring two academic professors of architecture, two professional architects and two Roseville town planners.

Submissions must include a 500-word description presented in letter sized (8.5” x 11”) PDF format and two ARCH D Size (24” x 36”) boards featuring diagrams and text, in either JPG or PDF format.

The winners will be announced on 30 March and the first place team will receive a $500 USD prize. A second place prize of $250, third place prize of $100 and five honourable mentions will also be announced.

How to apply

Deadline

The deadline for submissions is 28 March

Contact details

Email: rosevilledda@roseville-mi.gov

View the competition website for more information

St Paul’s visitor centre case study: Q&A with Sean Affleck

The director at Make discusses lessons learned designing an information pavilion outside St Paul’s cathedral in the City of London, England

Make

Make

Sean Affleck

How did your St Paul’s Visitor Centre project create an appropriate information pavilion for the City of London?

The brief demanded a striking design that engages with its context, including the historic St Paul’s opposite, and creates a distinct visual impact. We provided a welcoming, accessible contemporary building that provides a new, enlarged public arrival space at the top of Peter’s Hill, fully embracing London’s unique combination of heritage and modernity. We designed the building in close collaboration with the client, community groups, CABE, English Heritage and the surveyor of the fabric of St Paul’s Cathedral. Its triangular plan evolved from analysis of pedestrian movement around the site, while its orientation and profile establish an intriguing dialogue with St Paul’s. The visitor centre’s structure quite literally looks up to its prestigious neighbour and opens out to embrace the people who approach it. Appropriately for a global city, the structure is highly sustainable and houses state-of-the-art facilities and technology for staff and visitors.

City of London, England

City of London, England

St Paul’s visitor centre by Make

Which architectural, material and other methods did you harness?

Owing to the historic and archaeological nature of the site, we wanted the structure to be lightweight, with minimal foundations to reduce any potential disturbance to the ground beneath. We designed a stressed-skin structure, with a steel frame braced by a structural ply skin and clad in stainless steel panels to achieve the large cantilevers required while minimising foundations. This also minimised the thickness and weight of the structural envelope – an important consideration in a building of this scale.

City of London, England

City of London, England

St Paul’s visitor centre by Make

The steel frame was prefabricated in two separate sections, which were craned on to the site at night and assembled over the course of a couple of days to make construction as quick as possible on the heritage site. We paid particular attention to thermal efficiency. The form maximises daylight to the front-of-house yet the orientation minimises solar gains and reduces the temperature-controlled spaces so as to curtail energy use. There are also ground-source heat pumps and a rainwater collection system for greywater and irrigation.

What advice would you have to participants on designing an information pavilion and community space for Roseville?

Examine the area as well as the requirement for the building itself. The design needs to think about placemaking, and should relate to its surroundings and sit appropriately within its context. It’s also important to future-proof the space and consider ways to balance technological advances with the basic human desire to talk to people. After all, an information centre is a gathering point; a place for people to come together and engage. It needs to reflect this civic nature – it shouldn’t just be functional.

City of London, England

City of London, England

St Paul’s visitor centre by Make