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Competition: Trondheim campus masterplan, Norway

The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) has launched an ideas and planning competition for a new centralised campus in Trondheim (Deadline: 9 January)

The two-stage contest seeks ideas to consolidate the university by expanding its main campus in Gløshaugen and improving its integration with the surrounding city.

NTNU has 39,000 students and more than 5,000 staff, and recently became the largest university in Norway following its merger with two other colleges. The latest project is part of plans to create a new super campus at Gløshaugen, bringing together all of the expanded university’s facilities within walking distance of the city centre.

Trondheim, Norway

Trondheim, Norway

Source: Image by Erik Børseth

NTNU in Gløshaugen

NTNU intends to centralise the campus in Trondheim around the Gløshaugen area by 2025 and, according to the competition brief, is ‘inviting proposals for a two-stage idea and planning competition for development and drafting of a comprehensive campus plan.

‘The overall objective of the competition process is to obtain a concept for a high-level structure for the campus and location of required space, which to the best extent reflect the quality program within the approved location concept.’

Trondheim is the third largest city in Norway with a population of 187,000. It was founded in 997 as a trading post and served as the country’s capital during the Viking Age until 1217.

The city is dominated by technology-oriented institutions, including the NTNU, the Foundation for Scientific and Industrial Research, and St Olavs University Hospital.

Trondheim, Norway

Trondheim, Norway

NTNU in Gløshaugen

NTNU was formed in 1996 by the merger of six separate university colleges. Previously it had been part of the Trondheim Society which was established in 1760 and became the Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters seven years later.

NTNU courses focus on sciences and technology but also include medicine, humanities, arts and music subjects. The latest development aims to raise the profile of the city as a major education centre in Europe.

Up to six entries shortlisted schemes will be selected for further development ahead of a final tendering round. Proposals will be judged on their ability to deliver a comprehensive solution for the campus, compliance with local building regulations and the overall practicality of construction.

The competition languages are Norwegian, Danish and Swedish. Up to 3.5 million NOK is available for the initial ideas phase of the competition, while the second planning phase has a budget of 2.5 million NOK.

Phase one winners will each receive 150,000 NOK and receive an additional design development budget of 100,000 NOK. Teams participating in phase two will also receive 350,000 NOK each on completing their submissions.

How to apply

Deadline

The deadline for submissions is at 11:59 pm EST on 9 January

Contact details

Hege Elisabeth Sannan Skorild
NTNU
974767880
Klæbuveien 72
7012 Trondheim
Norway

Telephone: +47 73412599
E-mail: hege.skorild@ntnu.no

View the competition website for more information

Waterside Campus case study: Q&A with Colin Moses

The director at MCW Architects discusses lessons learned consolidating the University of Northampton’s (UoN) campus in England

MCW Architects

MCW Architects

Colin Moses

How will your Waterside Campus masterplan help the University of Northampton consolidate its activities?

The 22ha town centre site allows UoN teaching, residential and social activities to be collocated on a purposely designed single campus, replacing two existing edge-of-town sites. Our masterplan is a product of dialogue with the University within this unusual project context that is without the constraints or legacy issues of an existing estate. This has enabled them and us to think and plan for an institutional and pedagogical structure that both erodes existing boundaries and makes new connections between members of the learning community. New facilities maximise the efficiency and quality of the estate, fully exploit technology, enhancing the learning, working and social aspects of university life and provide a strong platform for the future.

Universty of Northampton

Universty of Northampton

MCW Architects’ Waterside Campus

Which architectural, masterplanning and other methods have you harnessed to ensure a high-quality result?

Our masterplanning work has focused on creating a robust and comprehensive development framework for the campus as a whole, setting out overall spatial structure, density and scale of development, pattern of connectivity. There is sufficient flexibility in the framework to allow individual buildings to be developed over time to meet their particular requirements and to respond to inevitable change. We have adopted a consultative and inclusive approach to ensure effective engagement with members of the community, both within and without the university. We have also advocated the inclusion of other architectural teams to design and deliver elements within the overall masterplan in order to create a richer response.

Universty of Northampton

Universty of Northampton

MCW Architects’ Waterside Campus

What issues are important when consolidating an existing university on a single campus?

Ensuring that the creation of a place is at the heart of the process – particularly a place that will have a true sense of ‘completeness’ from the outset while still having the capacity to grow and change. Working hard to produce a ‘pedestrian first’ environment through the effective integration and management of pedestrian, private vehicle and public transport movement across the campus. Establishing a comprehensive and forward-looking strategy for the above and below ground infrastructure and the resultant interfaces with both building and landscape. Making sure that the communication of a clear vision to staff, students and the wider community is also a continuous and evolving process.

Universty of Northampton

Universty of Northampton

MCW Architects’ Waterside Campus