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Competition: eVolo skyscraper ideas contest 2018

Architecture and design journal eVolo is once again inviting entries to its annual skyscraper ideas competition, featuring a $5,000 USD top prize (Deadline: 23 January)

Open to artists, architects, students and designers, the anonymous contest seeks conceptual proposals for innovative, dynamic and adaptive vertical communities with no limitations on size or location.

The annual call for ideas, first held in 2006, aims to promote dialogue around new approaches to urban development. Yitan Sun and Wu Jianshi’s innovative ’Sidescraper’ proposal (pictured) for New York City was named overall winner of 2016’s contest.

New York City

New York City

Sidescraper by Yitan Sun and Wu Jianshi

According to the brief: ‘The competition recognises outstanding ideas that redefine skyscraper design through the implementation of novel technologies, materials, programs, aesthetics, and spatial organisations along with studies on globalisation, flexibility, adaptability, and the digital revolution. It is a forum that examines the relationship between the skyscraper and the natural world, the skyscraper and the community, and the skyscraper and the city.

‘The participants should take into consideration the advances in technology, the exploration of sustainable systems, and the establishment of new urban and architectural methods to solve economic, social, and cultural problems of the contemporary city including the scarcity of natural resources and infrastructure and the exponential increase of inhabitants, pollution, economic division, and unplanned urban sprawl.’

Now in its 12th year, the annual programme aims to explore the relationships between skyscrapers and the natural world, local communities and the city. Conceptual designs should be adaptive, encourage self-regulation and help create a dynamic equilibrium between humans and nature.

Competition judges include PAU principal Vishaan Chakrabarti, Eric Höweler of Höweler + Yoon, James Ramsey from Raad Studio, and Chris Precht and Dayong Sun of PENDA.

Heal berg, reverse climate changing machine by Luca Beltrame, Saba Nabavi Tafresh

Heal berg, reverse climate changing machine by Luca Beltrame, Saba Nabavi Tafresh

Heal berg, reverse climate changing machine by Luca Beltrame, Saba Nabavi Tafresh

Entries must include a 600-word project statement, two A0-sized presentations boards and a document containing the professional details of all team members.

The overall winner, set to be announced on 10 April, will receive a $5,000 USD prize. There will also be a second prize of $2,000 USD and a third prize of $1,000 USD.

How to apply

Deadline

The deadline for submissions is 11:59pm (EST) on 23 January

Fee

$135 USD

Contact details

Email: skyscraper2018@evolo.us

Visit the competition website for more information

Vertical Factories in Megacities case study: Q&A with Tianshu Liu and Linshen Xie

The second place winners of last year’s competition discuss lessons learned

How did your Vertical Factories in Megacities project reimagine the future of high-rise buildings?

By 2025, the number of megacities (cities with populations over 10 million) will have grown from 23 to 36, and the population in the top 600 cities in the world will grow by 500 million. In the near future, two-thirds of the world’s population will live in megacities.

Factories moved to areas outside cities because they were noisy and polluting. But now, many factories are cleaner and could have a new place in the urban environment. Moving them back into the city would provide a higher quality of life, by allowing employees to walk to work rather than commute in cars. Urban factories would be closer to populations of skilled workers, suppliers and technical and research centres.

This is the vision we have for the cities of tomorrow: factories will be dissolved into small pieces and then be stacked together into high rise vertical factories. By bringing factories back to the city, we can achieve zero CO2 emissions, energy efficient, even higher quality of life, resource efficient.

Vertical Factories in Megacities by Tianshu Liu and Linshen Xie

Vertical Factories in Megacities by Tianshu Liu and Linshen Xie

Vertical Factories in Megacities by Tianshu Liu and Linshen Xie

Which architectural, material, social and other methods did you harness in your design?

The idea of this design comes from one of our design studios at Cornell University. The studio is called architecture and ecology. We learned to draw energy flow diagram and translated it into architectural space. At that time, we come up with the idea of using the building as a big machine.

What advice would you have to contest participants on taking part in the latest eVolo competition?

We did this competition during the winter break of our last semester. And we spend 3/4 of the whole design process to do research. We believe that a well-grounded design concept is the most important thing for a design competition. As architectural students, we already know how to illustrate our ideas using beautiful drawings and diagrams, but don’t forget to come up with a unique concept first.

Vertical Factories in Megacities by Tianshu Liu and Linshen Xie

Vertical Factories in Megacities by Tianshu Liu and Linshen Xie

Vertical Factories in Megacities by Tianshu Liu and Linshen Xie