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Competition: Dubai Creek Harbour Mosque

UAE developer Emaar has launched an open international contest to design an ‘iconic’ 9,750m² mosque in Dubai (Deadline: 21 May)

Open to architects and architectural students, the competition seeks proposals for a landmark mosque within the 5.6 million m² Dubai Creek Harbour development, which has been masterplanned by CallisonRTKL and will feature a skyscraper centrepiece by Santiago Calatrava.

The project will create a 7,500-capacity venue for daily, Friday and Eid prayers on a prominent 18,504m² site located on a landscaped axial route between Calatrava’s Dubai Creek Tower and the waterfront. Proposals will be expected to include underground parking and a 2,000-capacity roof terrace.

Dubai Creek Harbour

Dubai Creek Harbour

Dubai Creek Harbour

In its brief, Emaar says its ‘vision for Dubai Creek Harbour is to create an urban city that respects the culture and climate of Dubai; a place where people can live, work and play in harmony with nature and a community where families can reach their aspirations for generations to come.’

Dubai is the largest and most populous city in the UAE and in two years’ will be the first entity within the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia region to host a world expo. Dubai Creek Harbour is a major new mixed-use development located around 33km north-east of the Expo 2020 Dubai site.

The 550ha Dubai Creek Harbour development will transform a previously undeveloped inland waterfront site a short distance from the Burj Khalifa skyscraper and Dubai International Airport. It is expected to have 48,500 residential units and a population of 175,000 when completed.

Once complete, the scheme will feature a mix of residential, retail, hotel, office, cultural and community uses centred around a competition-winning supertall tower designed by Calatrava and parkland.

Dubai Creek Harbour

Dubai Creek Harbour

Dubai Creek Harbour

The new mosque will feature a library and other supporting facilities on a key site located within a linear park stretching westwards from the tower towards the waterfront.

The competition language is English and submissions should include drawings, 3D renderings along with a textual description of the concept.

The overall winner will receive a $40,000 prize and the design contract. Four shortlisted teams will also receive $10,000 each.

How to apply

Deadline

The deadline for applications is midday local time, 21 May

Contact details

Email: designcompetition@emaar.com

Visit the competition website for more information

Cambridge Mosque case study: Q&A with Julia Barfield

The co-founder of Marks Barfield Architects discusses lessons learned designing a new eco-friendly mosque for Cambridge, England

How will your project deliver a suitable and environmentally-friendly mosque for Cambridge?

We wanted to create a British mosque. Traditionally throughout the world take on the traditions and materials of their place, for example a North African mosque is different from a Turkish or Malaysian or Chinese mosque. The Muslim population in Great Britain is doubling every 15 years, so we are trying to look at what a British mosque could be in the twenty-first century, that was our starting point. We also wanted it to link so there was a continuity of past and future while also relating to its place. But there are also universal values, which we took to be the universal value of the garden, the grove of trees with an oasis. The design is therefore a combination of universal values and specific values to Islam and to sacred British architecture such as the pan vaulting of nearby Kings College Chapel.

Cambridge Mosque by Marks Barfield Architects

Cambridge Mosque by Marks Barfield Architects

Cambridge Mosque by Marks Barfield Architects

Which architectural, material, visual and other methods did you harness in your design?

We obviously wanted to be very green. The prayer hall which is a very big space which is completely naturally ventilated with very high levels of insulation surpassing Part L. The building is very low energy, we are using air source heat pumps, lots of natural light to reduce energy usage, solar panels and a green roof for biodiversity. We have done as much as we can with making it as green as we can. As with most mosques there is a journey you take from the public road to the main prayer hall and that is a very important sequence. Here you come off the road into a garden then into a portico before the ablution areas and then into the prayer hall which is orientated with the Qibla wall towards Mecca. In terms of materials we are using gault tiles contextual to local gault bricks so the building fits in and stands out at the same time.

Cambridge Mosque by Marks Barfield Architects

Cambridge Mosque by Marks Barfield Architects

Cambridge Mosque by Marks Barfield Architects

What advice would you have to contest participants on designing a new iconic mosque for Dubai Creek Harbour?

I would think about what a sacred space should be in the 21st century in the context of Dubai. We wanted to make our building very appropriate to the place and the time, and inclusiveness is also really important. It should be a place of contemplation but it could also be a place to question some of the norms. Dubai is a very 21st century place and it should reflect that in terms of inclusivity for women.

Cambridge Mosque by Marks Barfield Architects

Cambridge Mosque by Marks Barfield Architects

Cambridge Mosque by Marks Barfield Architects

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