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Infinite Landscape Installation, Sapporo, Japan

A temporary installation in Sapporo lake fuses landscape and architecture in a single move

Set in the middle of a lake in Sapporo, this enigmatic project is a hybrid of landscape and architecture, but somehow transcends both. ‘If architecture is something to project and support the human body’, says its architect Ryo Yamada ‘then this is not architecture, as what this place supports is just the time spent there.’

Inifinite Landscape

The enigmatic ‘floating’ box sits in the middle of the lake, accessible by a narrow walkway skimming across its surface.

A ‘floating’ box is reached by a narrow 14-metre long walkway that skims across the surface of the lake. Visitors are naturally inclined to take the shortest route, but this consciously lengthens their path, prompting them to think about the meaning of movement and the time spent walking. Constructed from flakeboard, the L-shaped box has a stark, elemental quality. Its interior is painted black and its short end walls hover above the lake surface so that water partially floods the space. Light reflects off the water and subtly permeates the dark interior, the patterns of illumination changing with the weather and time of day.The jury admired the concept that resonates with the elements and the passage of time, and its simple yet moving execution.

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Inifinite Landscape

Light reflected off the water permeates the Stygian interior

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